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Happy Halloween! Discounted Music!

October 30, 2014

Happy, Happy Halloween, Halloween, Halloween! Happy, Happy Halloween, major discounts!

It’s time! It’s time! It’s time for the big giveaway kids!

WARNING: Video may induce seizures. Watch at your own risk. We also can’t be held responsible if your head suddenly becomes a big flesh bag of snakes, scorpions, cockroaches and centipedes.

 

In celebration of Halloween and the release of my Halloween themed “March of the Inanimate”, the following releases are discounted to only $1.99 for the full Digital Album if purchased directly from CD Baby!!!!

KeithRichie-MarchoftheInanimate March of the Inanimate

A homage to classic horror soundtracks featuring eerie, creepy and foreboding ambient music.
Purchase Digital Album for only $1.99
 
KeithRichie-FortheWillowWept For the Willow Wept…

A collection of soothing electronic music about those once lost and those found
Purchase Digital Album for only $1.99

 
KeithRichie-LaFamilleDuSolenoide La Famille Du Solénoïde

A musical tour through our solar system inspired by the book “The Planets” by Dava Sobel.
Purchase Digital Album for only $1.99
 
KeithRichie-TheMaestoso The Maestoso Interstellar Suite

Dreamy, majestic, and ambient space music album. One continuous piece of music split across 6 movements, sure to relax and calm the spirit.
Purchase Digital Album for only $1.99

 

 

Enjoy!

- Keith

6 more days till Halloween, here’s some cool tunes!

October 26, 2014

6 more days till Halloween, Halloween, Halloween! 6 more days till Halloween, here’s some cool tunes!

From now through Halloween October 31st, 2014 you can download your high quality copy of “March of the Inanimate” for only $3.10 direct from CDBaby!

March of the Inanimate Cover Official

March of the Inanimate is a bit of a homage to the classic horror movie soundtracks produced by John Carpenter and Alan Howarth who co-wrote the music to classics such as Halloween, the Fog, and numerous others.

The classic themes from those movies is what initially inspired me to get into electronic soundtrack music, and creating soundtrack music is something I’ve always wanted to do.

Even though this set of music isn’t tied to any film, it does tell a unique story in it’s own right.

I hope you enjoy it well enough to include in your collection.

Click this link to buy your copy today!

Want to hear the entire release in full before you purchase? Just head on over to SoundCloud and check it out!

Click this link to listen to March of the Inanimate on SoundCloud!

And don’t forget about the big giveaway! Be sure to gather around kids in front of your TV sets on Halloween!

WARNING: Video may induce seizures. Watch at your own risk. We also can’t be held responsible if your head suddenly becomes a big flesh bag of snakes, scorpions, cockroaches and centipedes.

Enjoy!

– Keith

March of the Inanimate Released!

October 23, 2014

March of the Inanimate Cover OfficialJust in time for the Halloween Season "March of the Inanimate" is Officially Released and is available for purchase from CDBaby!

March of the Inanimate is a bit of a homage to the classic horror movie soundtracks produced by John Carpenter and Alan Howarth who co-wrote the music to classics such as Halloween, the Fog, and numerous others.  

The classic themes from those movies is what initially inspired me to get into electronic soundtrack music, and creating soundtrack music is something I’ve always wanted to do.

This release features eerie, creepy and foreboding ambient music sure to get you into the Halloween spirit, and even though this set of music isn’t tied to any film, it does tell a unique story in it’s own right.

Head on over to CDBaby and check out March of the Inanimate!

I hope you enjoy it well enough to include in your collection.

Enjoy!

- Keith Richie

Forbidden Cottage–Close to finished!

October 10, 2014

 

Halloween_Wallpapers31

A little over two years ago I decided to start work on a set of music that was Halloween Themed.   It was something I’ve always wanted to do.

I had a couple of different tracks somewhat complete, and was considering releasing an EP of about 4 tracks or so.  Last weekend as I started working back in my studio and I somehow managed to polish up a couple more tracks, and then another, to where I had what I thought was a near complete number of tracks that I could turn into a full release!

I decided to title the release Forbidden Cottage after one of the tracks I had previously written.

The Forbidden Cottage release is a bit of a homage to the classic horror movie soundtracks produced by John Carpenter and Alan Howarth who co-wrote the music to Halloween, the Fog, The Thing, Escape from New York, etc.

I still have plenty of work to do on it, and plan on spending a bit more time fine tuning and mixing this weekend.  Then I need to finalize the cover art.

I also have to thank the folks at Pumpkinrot and their insanely creepy works that helped inspire me! Especially the Roots scarecrow that inspired the track March of the Inanimate.

If you want to hear the current version of it then head on over to SoundCloud and listen to Forbidden Cottage in it’s current form!

https://soundcloud.com/keithrichie/sets/forbidden-cottage

Enjoy! And let me know what you think!

– Keith

This Cup

September 13, 2013

WP_20130913_001I remember despising coffee, but my mother was a coffee fiend!

I remember times when my brother, sister and I would see my mothers coffee cup sitting on the table, and we would taste it, and found it bitter and not liking it too terribly much.  We would add tons of sugar, milk and creamer to it, but it never really seemed to taste any better.  Mom would eventually come back into the kitchen, seeing it barren of any of us.  There would be remnants of sugar and creamer on the table, and a unnatural and extremely white color to her cup of coffee.  She would pour it out, and holler across the house for us to leave her coffee alone.  We did.

My father drank coffee a great deal as well.  He and My mother were no longer married, but he would stay for a while when picking us up, or dropping us back off, or just in general. He would sit, and they would drink coffee together and have conversation.

As I grew older, got married, had a child, etc. I would visit my mom often.  She would drink her coffee, and I would drink something; anything else but coffee. We would catch up, and sit and talk for hours.

For years, I still just didn’t care for coffee.  Until… I took a job as a bank teller for a local bank.  At the time, I didn’t have many a penny to my name.  I couldn’t even afford to buy a soda from the drink machine, and water was just boring.  But…. The coffee was free.

And thus, because it had a different flavor, than no real flavor at all, I begin my slow decline into coffee addiction.  On the bright side, however, now I would also drink coffee when I would visit my mother.

Before I knew it, I guess I did what every other avid coffee drinker would do and start collecting random coffee mugs; cups, etc.  There were always various mugs and cups to choose from at my house and my mothers.

In the latter part of the 90s, I had to travel a great deal for the company I worked for at the time.  The up side was that I would generally travel to a new part of the country.  The downside, was that I would be away from my family.  But of course, like any good traveler, I would pick up souvenirs to bring home to my family. For me, this happened to be the “City” beanie baby bears for my daughter, and a “City” Coffee Mug/Cup for myself. When I had my regular visits with my mother to share coffee and conversation, I would always bring one of the random cups in my cupboard with me.

One particular cup (pictured at the beginning of this post) has been in my family for quite a few years now, and there is a very interesting story associated with this one.

You see, in the early part of 2009, my mothers husband passed away.  I was also going through a tough part in my life, and had recently moved back to the house that I had owned.  My mothers health was beginning to deteriorate and so my brother had asked if they could also come live with me at my house. Without any hesitation, my answer was an astounding yes!

It was a wonderful time of my life.  My mother would generally always have coffee made, and I would take frequent breaks from work and sit and have a cup of coffee and conversation with her.

Of all the cups and mugs in the house, she generally used this particular cup. If it wasn’t in the drain rack, it was in the room she stayed in. Eventually, my mother and brother decided to get their own place, and moved into an apartment. I would visit their apartment frequently, and share a cup of coffee and conversation with my mother.

On one particular day during my visits, I looked down at the table, and at the cup my mother had in her hand, and realized it was MY cup from the house.  I exclaimed “Hey Mom! You stole my cup!” 

She looked at me in shock and replied with remorse “I’m sorry son! I didn’t realize it was yours.  I’ve just been drinking out of it for so long!”. 

I explained to her that “I truly was kidding.  I didn’t truly mind at all. I just thought it was rather funny to look down and realize you had stolen a cup of mine from the house.  It’s ok Mom.  It’s your cup now”.

We laughed. We drank coffee.  We talked, about this cup.

It’s a silly thing. A simple coffee mug; cup; whatever you want to call it. With cartoonish drawings of iconic scenes of San Francisco.  But my mom loved it, and it has certainly seen it’s use.  Even when it’s sparkling clean, you would think it’s been sitting for days with how dark and discolored it is inside.

Mom loved her coffee.  I loved having coffee with my mom.  I loved having coffee with my mom, and watching her sip it from the cup she stole from my house.

As time progressed, Mom couldn’t enjoy her coffee as much as she once did.  She would always want some, and at times we would slip her a little; cooled way down with ice.

I started missing the days when Mom and I would sit at the table drinking our coffee and talking for hours. We solved a lot of world problems in those days.

My mom passed away last night, and as my brother and sister and I dealt with the emotions and the loss, I saw this cup.

This cup, that my mother claimed. This cup, that my mother held in her hands for so long. This cup, of life.

I hold this cup mom, and I drink from it, and I think of you.

This cup symbolizes my love and relationship with you.  The sharing we had together.

I love you and miss you mom!

This cup… is for you.

SPUserCollection.Remove() throws misleading exception “Cannot complete this action”

July 22, 2013

 

Over the weekend we performed a User Migration of our primary SharePoint 2010 farm.  In our case, which is probably a quite common scenario, we had users from both the source and target domain that we were migrating actively using the system.  In our scenario, the “TARGET” domain is the company that acquired us and our portals in the “SOURCE” domain.  New users from the target domain needed to access our portals in the source domain, and our source domain users needed to continue business as usual until we were prepared to migrate source users into the target domain.

Of course, with any company acquisition, there are many levels of migration steps, and one of those for us was the users actual AD accounts were migrated months ago, so they use TARGET\user as their primary logon, but when accessing the SharePoint sites, they re-log in with their current SOURCE\user until those accounts in SharePoint are migrated, but this left a problem we had to work around, and that problem being that the users had hit SharePoint with their TARGET domain account, and thus had both a reference to their SOURCE domain account and their TARGET domain account in SharePoint.  You can’t call the SharePoint Migrate commands to migrate a user from the source to the target, if the target already exists.  It will fail since the target user already exists.

Therefore, what we needed to do delete the target domain instances of their account in SharePoint before migrating their source account. 

Doing that from the object model is a very simple process. You just enumerate over every site collection, and call SPUserCollection.Remove() using the SiteUsers collection of the RootWeb in the site collection.  The only problem that we ran in to, was something I’ve actually seen a long long time ago, but never thought to actually document the problem before.

 

Consider the following section of code:

  
foreach (SPWebApplication wa in SPWebService.ContentService.WebApplications)
{
  WritePurgeOutput("Examining web application: " + wa.Name);
  // Enumerate all site collections in the web application
  foreach (SPSite sc in wa.Sites)
  {
  try
  {
    // Get the root web, so that we can get to SiteUsers.
    // SiteUsers represents all users in the site collection.
    using (SPWeb web = sc.RootWeb)
    {
      foreach (SharePointUser user in users)
      {
        WritePurgeOutput("Removing login: " + user.LoginName);
        try
        {
          web.SiteUsers.Remove(user.LoginName);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
          WritePurgeOutput(string.Format("ERROR - purging User '{0}' " +
           "from site collection '{1}': {2} ", 
           user.LoginName, sc.Url, ex.ToString()));
        }
      }
    }
  }
  catch (Exception ex)
  {
    WritePurgeOutput(string.Format("ERROR - purging Users " +
      "from site collection '{0}': {1} ", 
      sc.Url, ex.ToString()));
  }
  finally
  {
    sc.Dispose();
  }
}

 

The foreach(SharePointUser user in users) section is a collection of user objects containing the information for the users we want to purge from the system.  We had a prepared list of all the users that were AD migrated, and the user collection information was their  login name in the TARGET\user formation. WritePurgeOutput() is just a method that’s going to …we… write purge output.

In testing, this worked flawlessly.   I had some of my test members in the site, and deleted them, then ran this code while some were still permissioned.   For those that were still permissioned, they were removed, and for those that didn’t exist anymore, it still just called SiteUsers.Remove() without any problems.  In production though, we ran into an interesting exception.

We started noticing the following exception being thrown when the Remove() call was made:

"Cannot complete this action.\n\nPlease try again."

Our first thought was there there was something wrong in the access rights granted to the account we were using while logged onto the server to run our tool. (See http://blog.krichie.com/2008/09/11/unrestricted-access-via-sharepoint-object-model-from-console-applications/) But we did see successful executions as well, so that didn’t appear to be the problem.

It turns out, that Remove() only throws an exception if the user truly had NEVER visited the site collection (or was added) and therefore, there was NO record in the Users table.

YET, when a user DOES exist in the Users table, but was previous deleted (the tp_Deleted column has a positive value), the Remove() method just silently returns.  In other words, the user TRULY does not exist as an active user for the site collection, but that users information still exists in the database associated to the site collection.  He’s just marked deleted.  This made us think that SPUserCollection.Remove() would just silently return when called for a login that didn’t exist in the site.

Instead, our logs were filled with the exception message noted above, and leading us down a path of misguided troubleshooting.

 

In the end, we modified the code to look something similar to the following:

 

  
foreach (SPWebApplication wa in SPWebService.ContentService.WebApplications)
{
  WritePurgeOutput("Examining web application: " + wa.Name);
  // Enumerate all site collections in the web application
  foreach (SPSite sc in wa.Sites)
  {
  try
  {
    // Get the root web, so that we can get to SiteUsers.
    // SiteUsers represents all users in the site collection.
    using (SPWeb web = sc.RootWeb)
    {
      foreach (SharePointUser user in users)
      {
        WritePurgeOutput("Removing login: " + user.LoginName);
        try
        {
          SPUser userexists = null;
          userexists = web.SiteUsers[user.LoginName);
          if(userexists != null)
            web.SiteUsers.Remove(user.LoginName);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
          if(ex.Message != "User cannot be found.")
            WritePurgeOutput(string.Format("ERROR - purging User '{0}' " +
             "from site collection '{1}': {2} ", 
             user.LoginName, sc.Url, ex.ToString()));
        }
      }
    }
  }
  catch (Exception ex)
  {
    WritePurgeOutput(string.Format("ERROR - purging Users " +
      "from site collection '{0}': {1} ", 
      sc.Url, ex.ToString()));
  }
  finally
  {
    sc.Dispose();
  }
}

 

So we look for the user in the collection, and if it throws an exception with a message of “User cannot be found”, we just eat that and move on.   If we did find the user, then we make the call to Remove().

A nice exception message of “User cannot be found” on the call to Remove() in the first place, would have been really helpful.

 

- Keith

Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came, My next musical endeavor?

December 6, 2012

A few months ago, I released “For the Willow Wept…” .  It took a long time to finish after “La Famille Du Solénoïde ” but I was very happy to get back into my music creation mojo.

Since then, I’ve been trying to figure out what “theme” I would try to accomplish next.  I still want to do a limited “Extended” edition physical copy of Willow, and that should still occur.  As well, I plan on doing a “Halloween” themed release featuring themes such as “March of the Inanimate”.  As well, I’ve been trying to work on a pure “Electronica” release signified by  Neurotic Tendenies.

But I need something to drive me forward.

Recently I started re-reading my two favorite series, and I think I’ve decided I want to do a musical interpretation of them.

First (as this post title implies) is a musical interpretation of the great Dark Tower series by Stephen King.

 

There have been plenty of times where I’ve envisioned music along with this.

Second, is another great classic “Dune” by Frank Herbert.

I’m curious however, would you be interested in a musical interpretation of these classics by me? Let me know!

 

- Keith

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